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Thread: Explaining how games work?

  1. #21
    MALKIOR THE DESTROYER KaizokuJinbei's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    So for Unity I wanted to try it out but i noticed it has premium versions that have features not available to the free version I just want to know if these features make using the free version any harder to use
    PSN: Ryuunaga, Nintendo Switch Friend ID: SW-1971-9767-4001, Steam: Malkior7, 3DS FC: 4167-5777-1464



  2. #22

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by KaizokuJinbei View Post
    So for Unity I wanted to try it out but i noticed it has premium versions that have features not available to the free version I just want to know if these features make using the free version any harder to use
    I don't think any of those features would be of any importance to someone just starting out or using unity for non commercial use.

  3. #23

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?



    Sry no update yet but wanted to share this. Found it super interesting although there seemed to have been a ton of stuff to cover so they didn't go into as much depth as I would have loved. But it was great to get certain confirmations on a few assumptions I had on the game and also hearing a few things I didn't really understand about how they were doing it. Even if the game ends up sucking I still will be impressed by the engineering effort behind it.

    Watch it if you're kind of interested maybe in how certain different systems are linked to each other.

  4. #24
    Must've been rats Sakonosolo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    I feel like procedural generation is a good tool but I don't think it works well for open world games, especially if it's being used to generate the entire world and everything in it.

  5. #25
    MALKIOR THE DESTROYER KaizokuJinbei's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by DarthAsthma View Post
    I don't think any of those features would be of any importance to someone just starting out or using unity for non commercial use.
    I want to make a game I just want to make sure none of the features premium versions exclusively have are crucial for it
    PSN: Ryuunaga, Nintendo Switch Friend ID: SW-1971-9767-4001, Steam: Malkior7, 3DS FC: 4167-5777-1464



  6. #26

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by KaizokuJinbei View Post
    I want to make a game I just want to make sure none of the features premium versions exclusively have are crucial for it
    I mean the answer doesn't really change I don't think unless you're going full professional(especially with a team) planning to make money from it I don't think it's going to be of any importance. It's hard to answer though without knowing your position just based on the question itself I just assume you're just starting out(but dunno maybe it's a special case I'm not thinking of)? If yes in that case questions about pro licenses etc aren't really thing you should bother with. Rather worry about anything that gets you going actually making stuff.

    I feel like people just trying to get into making games have a tendency to worry about the equivalent of artists conundrums regarding what type of pencil thickness to use to draw something completely forgetting about actually drawing something. Just out of curiosity what features would you realistically expect you would need from the pro version when you look at the license page?

  7. #27
    MALKIOR THE DESTROYER KaizokuJinbei's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by DarthAsthma View Post
    I feel like people just trying to get into making games have a tendency to worry about the equivalent of artists conundrums regarding what type of pencil thickness to use to draw something completely forgetting about actually drawing something. Just out of curiosity what features would you realistically expect you would need from the pro version when you look at the license page?
    Nothing in particular it's just when I use game development/graphic design software I like to have as many resources as possible at my disposal so that when I'm working on any projects I'll have more options and diversity
    PSN: Ryuunaga, Nintendo Switch Friend ID: SW-1971-9767-4001, Steam: Malkior7, 3DS FC: 4167-5777-1464



  8. #28
    Must've been rats Sakonosolo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    UE4 might be better if you're just starting out as you get the entire engine for free (so you dont have to worry about misding fratures) and only have to pay if you actually start selling it and make a good deal of money. Unity might be easier to use at some things but it's scripting languages aren't common in other engines and UE4 has that blueprint mode which basically doesn't require programming knowledge to use.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Gameloops part 2 https://docs.google.com/document/d/1...it?usp=sharing

    Would have posted directly but formatting is busted and this would have become a nightmare to read otherwise(it already kind of is since I don't have the time to add good pictures). Hope this was interesting if not let me know as well and why if you have a why. I'll try to consider for the next topic if I can think of one.

  10. #30

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    So I've encountered an interesting problem for one of my projects where the "optimal" solution that you can find being talked about seems to be a not so trivial technical challenge. Just wanted to share cause the contrast seemed amusing for how something that seems very simple actually requires quite a bit of ingenuity to solve depending on the resources you have.

    So basically I just want to have a 3d character seen from the third person perspective be able to walk stairs up and down.
    The simple solution is basically just make the walking animation cycle in a way that would blend perfectly with the stairs you plan to implement.
    And now encountering this I will actually pay attention now to how many games employ stairs of exact step height everywhere so the animation works no matter what.

    The harder solution(actually not sure if it's really that hard I'm basically sharing this like 30 min after running into it, but that's what I read so far) is actually learning about inverse kinematics and basically program joints to dynamically adjust to the ground.
    Which to my understanding allows way more freedom creating/designing stairs/obstacles with variable step height(actually just writing this out that doesn't sound like it's something worth the effort xD), but seems also to be somewhat complicated.

    Sorry for not really explaining anything here and instead being somewhat taken aback myself.
    Last edited by DarthAsthma; October 28th, 2016 at 03:10 PM.

  11. #31
    Must've been rats Sakonosolo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Inverse kinematics I don't think is hard to implement (I've never done it but I imagine like anything else there are set ways you can do it) but it takes a larger toll on performance because it involves physics calculations and such. I remember the game Sir, You Are Being Hunted wanted to implement it but said their performance hit with it was too much. Probably has a lot to do with how well you can optimize your game though as GTAIV, V, and the Stalker games all use it, among with lots of other games.

    Actually I think the first game to use inverse kinematics was Trespasser in 1998. It's kind of messy with it though because it's so old and it had tons of development issues.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sakonosolo View Post
    Inverse kinematics I don't think is hard to implement (I've never done it but I imagine like anything else there are set ways you can do it) but it takes a larger toll on performance because it involves physics calculations and such. I remember the game Sir, You Are Being Hunted wanted to implement it but said their performance hit with it was too much. Probably has a lot to do with how well you can optimize your game though as GTAIV, V, and the Stalker games all use it, among with lots of other games.

    Actually I think the first game to use inverse kinematics was Trespasser in 1998. It's kind of messy with it though because it's so old and it had tons of development issues.
    Yeah as far as I understand it, it's actually not that costly depending on how you use it/optimize it/limit it. There also seems to be something dealing with it for free on the Unity asset store but I haven't tinkered with that. Was pretty late yesterday for me to do more research on it and if I'm honest there is still lots of other stuff for me to do before tackling this stair thing. Oh well back to this thread drifting into obscurity

  13. #33

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Hello everyone,

    This semester, I took an Introduction to Game Development class, and we had to build a game in a group project. I was unsure where to post, making a new thread for this one and only post didn't seem reasonable, and Nokanqy had mentioned that this could be a good spot for users to share their games. It is a very short game, and we had to reduce the scope a bunch of times. This is NOT for sale, download it, have fun (hopefully) and if possible I would love all the feedback I could get. I can give more details about my involvement in the project, but I'd rather respond to that from any questions you might have like: which software we used, planning and other design questions. Using Unity we have built a copy for Windows. Also I do not own every asset in the game (you'll see what I mean, but for example: the map tiles). Anywho, without further ado, my first game:

    Title: The Casualties Report
    Platform: Windows
    Genre: Multiplayer, Co-op, Survival, Arena

    Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5i...I3NFFNNjQ/view

    Note: The build has Player 1 mapped to a keyboard and player 2 to a gamepad (I was using an Xbox 360 controller).
    Note 2: Keyboard: Movement -> W,A,S,D; Left Click -> Activate Ability + Basic Attack; Right Click -> Cancel Ability; Skills -> Q,E,R,T
    Note 3: Gamepad: Movement -> Left Joystick; Aim -> Right joystick; Activate Skill + Basic Attack -> Right Bumper; Skills -> A,B,X,Y

    THANKS, HAVE FUN!

  14. #34

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamiel View Post
    Hello everyone,

    This semester, I took an Introduction to Game Development class, and we had to build a game in a group project. I was unsure where to post, making a new thread for this one and only post didn't seem reasonable, and Nokanqy had mentioned that this could be a good spot for users to share their games. It is a very short game, and we had to reduce the scope a bunch of times. This is NOT for sale, download it, have fun (hopefully) and if possible I would love all the feedback I could get. I can give more details about my involvement in the project, but I'd rather respond to that from any questions you might have like: which software we used, planning and other design questions. Using Unity we have built a copy for Windows. Also I do not own every asset in the game (you'll see what I mean, but for example: the map tiles). Anywho, without further ado, my first game:

    Title: The Casualties Report
    Platform: Windows
    Genre: Multiplayer, Co-op, Survival, Arena

    Link: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5i...I3NFFNNjQ/view

    Note: The build has Player 1 mapped to a keyboard and player 2 to a gamepad (I was using an Xbox 360 controller).
    Note 2: Keyboard: Movement -> W,A,S,D; Left Click -> Activate Ability + Basic Attack; Right Click -> Cancel Ability; Skills -> Q,E,R,T
    Note 3: Gamepad: Movement -> Left Joystick; Aim -> Right joystick; Activate Skill + Basic Attack -> Right Bumper; Skills -> A,B,X,Y

    THANKS, HAVE FUN!
    Ok, I think I kinda finished the game. As in completed waves with the bounty hunter (kiku?) and cannot find a way to beat the second one with numbers robot.
    Feedback below spoilered for those who don't want to have their experience colored by my commentary:

    Spoiler:

    Technical difficulties:
    - I use a trackpad instead of a mouse and had difficulties with the game actually recognizing my inputs now and then. Mostly with the regular attacks, as there would be times I'd be clicking constantly and nothing would happen, whereas other times I'd be shooting lasers/slashing repeatedly.
    - Let's talk about the second wave for the robot... much as I tried, I was not able to complete it, and I noticed in part there was a section where the small green enemies would fly around the screen and latch themselves on to me with impossible speed, draining my health. Naturally, the reaction would be placing bombs around me as quickly and often as possible, but the enemy speed would have them surround me rather fast over again and I would die. I was able to get to this wave with almost full health too, and still died super fast.
    Putting it under technical since the speed of those green guys doesn't seem consistent with other waves where I can outrun them and plan accordingly.
    - There were times that the hook special of the bounty hunter didn't stun enemies. Like I would bring an octorok close to me and it'd be blue, but it'd continue to shoot.

    Also of note is I only did single player due to lack of a second player.

    Design comments:
    - I appreciate the mechanics of the game dictating the gameplay. For example, when I was reading the differences between the robot and the bounty hunter I simply assumed one to be shooty and the other more of a melee character, which was true, but the special abilities and enemy types led to more tactical differences.
    For example, the bounty hunter feels super strong and it's easy to chain from one super dash to slashing, or to turn the tables on enemies with the shield that takes their health or the black hole of death. BUT, when dealing with the octorok while trying not to take damage I had to give more thought to things, and bam, the hook thing became useful.
    Robot took a lot more getting used to, but once I realized how much more effective bombs were than running around I got dramatically better at the first wave. I like that for this guy the shield plants you in place (hope that's intentional?) forcing me to resort to bomb spreads and mines around me instead of shielding and running away.
    In short: there's clear tactics to each character that take playing with them to figure out, and I could see it being fun in multiplayer to collaborate with each other to overcome weaknesses

    - That said, the difficulty curve for the robot was much much higher, and like I said in the tech. difficulties section, I was unable to finish the game with it. From that sense, if I were to play this with people I would be compelled to play as the bounty hunter a lot more. Do they have the same health/defense? Can't say I noticed. And hey, this is a case where the abilities and trade-offs are obviously meant to balance them, that much is clear that thought went into it, but only once play-testing happens can you realize what character people gravitate to the most. Curious to see how other people respond to this.

    - The learning process was... kinda non-existent. While there was a screen explaining differences between the characters, the game started me up immediately and I was suddenly and harshly dealing with a bunch of enemies crowding me. Having small waves before what is currently the first one to introduce enemy types would be nice. Like, introduce a wave with just one enemy type (green crabs). Then a wave with a second enemy type (octoroks?), which involves a different approach. Then once you assume the player has learned how to deal with each in isolation, you can have a stage with both of them in it. Then, have a wave where people deal with green crabs while introduced to a buff dude, to learn that they're similar enemy types but the buff dude is stronger while moving slower. Thus, the player learns about how to deal with that enemy type, and then you have buff dudes with octoroks. And then all three!
    For players who die and have to start over, it would also be nice for them to feel their increase in skill, as they go back to that first level and are able to quickly end the wave with mastery of skills.
    This would also give time to let the player flesh out their control and abilities with more of a safety net and comfort than suddenly being overwhelmed by enemies and inevitably dying (both first runs with each character I either died or lost huge amounts of health and then got insta killed in wave 2). While it is the case that many people would die and be compelled to try again, there ARE people who would instead just stop playing altogether.

    - There wasn't a pause function <_<;
    or was there? I tried pressing multiple keys and nothing happened, but maybe I just missed it?

    - Let's talk about the character select UI. What it has going for it is that it clearly introduces both characters and explains how they are different.
    My issue with these is that the descriptions and structure involve a lot of reading. OK, relatively not that much, but still, they're blocky paragraphs and means that instead of just being able to jump into the game I have to read.
    And then, based on reading about things I can't possibly know much about (assuming I have never played before or don't know what this game is), I have to make a choice, a choice I am not informed enough to make. Inevitably means I pick a character for shallow reasons ("I guess I'll go with Samus instead of Portal robot"), and then don't know how much of what I'm doing pertains to the character until the point I die and go try the other character. Assuming I do instead of just quitting the game.
    That second one is hard to deal with in a small-scope game, but that first issue can be dealt with with more basic UI.
    For example, things like mario sports games have where they have the character, and then a word and a color naming their gameplay style. Robot could be things like range, or tactical, whereas the bounty hunter is more speed and close-combat. You could still do this with flavor text too, like "KIKU - 'time to get up-close and personal'; "124253 - 'you'll explode before you reach me'", instead of a long paragraph with story-telling about a story no one is going to be interested in (it's an action game) with some of these key words thrown in.
    (Btw, the robot needs a simpler name >_>;)
    - Other UI consideration... I like that the weapons are in the bottom of the screen in a game where enemies approach mainly from the top. Clean, ensures the UI isn't obstructing anything, good stuff. Ways to go further: color coding weapons so their borders let me know what to expect before using them.
    Like, say I didn't read the lines about the weapons... but, I see that this purple circle is yellow, and when I press it it's an AoE attack... now I know if I pick the other character that a yellow border (around the bomb spread for example) is going to be an AoE attack, and will only be compelled to use that when enemies are surrounding me without having to botch it, learn from that, and then wait (and die) while waiting for the re-charge.
    On this, a side note is that the mine power-up feels like the most crucial for the robot, but also the most unintuitive. When I read that you would dash and then drop a mine before doing so, I kept pressing the keys to dash to the right and nothing was happening later on (since Kiku's dash works with keys.) As I learned it worked with clicking, I would still often make the mistake to click in the direction I wanted to dash to, but instead I would drop a bomb in that direction and dash straight into the enemies, dying (it was hilarious btw.) I DO notice that there are little indicators when you activate a power about where it goes and how it would function, but the mine overall still feels unintuitive and it gets confusing going from one character's dash ability to the other's. The indicators are also hard to read when the enemies are all crowding you like you have the last must-have toy in black friday.

    I think that's all that comes to mind for now design-wise. OH, the music. Who did the music? I kept the character select screen on while writing that last part and the song in there is such an earworm. Pretty good stuff. Feels distinct and fits the game properly, and hasn't gotten grating. I dig it.

    Hope all that helps! I realize of course it's a first effort and given that there's a lot in here that show work and dedication and great design choices. Playing just a little bit reveals the presence of possible advance strategies using weapons and skills and environments, and even good possibilities of co-op from asymmetricality, and it's fun in that the challenge is clear and the rules and ironed out and fair. Lots of good stuff in there, and with more polish it can definitely evolve into more.


    This is a reminder too I need to begin investing in development tools and get working on stuff for myself. Been busy with design docs and studying, but I want to get my hands dirty already.

  15. #35

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Quote Originally Posted by Noqanky View Post
    Ok, I think I kinda finished the game. As in completed waves with the bounty hunter (kiku?) and cannot find a way to beat the second one with numbers robot. Feedback below spoilered for those who don't want to have their experience colored by my commentary:
    Kiku - bounty hunter / melee class.
    131201307 (Brobot) - sentry unit / ranger class.
    Thank you so much for your quick reply! I'll also spoiler my answers.


    Spoiler:
    Technical difficulties:
    - I use a trackpad instead of a mouse and had difficulties with the game actually recognizing my inputs now and then. Mostly with the regular attacks, as there would be times I'd be clicking constantly and nothing would happen, whereas other times I'd be shooting lasers/slashing repeatedly.
    -You can hold the basic attack and it will shoot constantly, I also had problems not using a mouse, however another team member didn't at all. I am not sure if the problem lies in the trackpads themselves or how the input is handled.
    - Let's talk about the second wave for the robot... much as I tried, I was not able to complete it, and I noticed in part there was a section where the small green enemies would fly around the screen and latch themselves on to me with impossible speed, draining my health. Naturally, the reaction would be placing bombs around me as quickly and often as possible, but the enemy speed would have them surround me rather fast over again and I would die. I was able to get to this wave with almost full health too, and still died super fast.
    Putting it under technical since the speed of those green guys doesn't seem consistent with other waves where I can outrun them and plan accordingly.
    -Yes, the green enemies: Sleazy Crawlers; have a bug where they build up moment if they are stuck between an enemy and an obstacle which when they get out of, they launch at you at impossible speeds. There are bugs we were not able to fix before the submission date and I have been sharing the game without fixing them ( I plan to keep working on the game after the semester and exams are done) because I think you can still appreciate the overall idea. Another tactic would be to raise your shield and drop bombs combined later with the Big Laser "T" ability. I know, this is not the way to go around things, but if you want to beat the game with Brobot. The game is only those two waves!

    - There were times that the hook special of the bounty hunter didn't stun enemies. Like I would bring an octorok close to me and it'd be blue, but it'd continue to shoot.
    -That is actually a big bug on my part. While making Daspitter (Octorok) I tried to have a Spawn Bullet object attached to Daspitter, instead of just instantiating it from itself. A lot of turret tutorials followed that approach, I only realized the problem on our final play testing!

    Also of note is I only did single player due to lack of a second player.
    - Multiplayer is focused on co-op gameplay. What I do is i push Brobot into a corner, and fight the enemies with Kiku (I user her a lot better than ranger). However, if you beat the 2 waves there is a twist at the end! I'll spoiler it just in case you want to try:
    Spoiler:
    In 2 player mode, after the waves are completed both players have to fight each other out. So co-op becomes player versus player. The ~lore~ behind it is that, Kiku and Bro have been captured and are subjects to intergalactic gladiator fights. So at first you survive the environment, but then you fight each other. During development phase I would joke about wanting an alternative ending where if players did not hit each other you'd get a screen saying: Peace wins!


    Design comments:
    - I appreciate the mechanics of the game dictating the gameplay. For example, when I was reading the differences between the robot and the bounty hunter I simply assumed one to be shooty and the other more of a melee character, which was true, but the special abilities and enemy types led to more tactical differences.
    For example, the bounty hunter feels super strong and it's easy to chain from one super dash to slashing, or to turn the tables on enemies with the shield that takes their health or the black hole of death. BUT, when dealing with the octorok while trying not to take damage I had to give more thought to things, and bam, the hook thing became useful.
    Robot took a lot more getting used to, but once I realized how much more effective bombs were than running around I got dramatically better at the first wave. I like that for this guy the shield plants you in place (hope that's intentional?) forcing me to resort to bomb spreads and mines around me instead of shielding and running away.
    In short: there's clear tactics to each character that take playing with them to figure out, and I could see it being fun in multiplayer to collaborate with each other to overcome weaknesses
    - Yes the shield for Brobot plants in you in place intentionally, and it also increases your attacks by 2x. We found that impeding your movement was a good drawback for the gains. I am happy that the tactics were clear, personally I am addicted to co-op games so I hope you get the chance to test out the part of the game!

    - That said, the difficulty curve for the robot was much much higher, and like I said in the tech. difficulties section, I was unable to finish the game with it. From that sense, if I were to play this with people I would be compelled to play as the bounty hunter a lot more. Do they have the same health/defense? Can't say I noticed. And hey, this is a case where the abilities and trade-offs are obviously meant to balance them, that much is clear that thought went into it, but only once play-testing happens can you realize what character people gravitate to the most. Curious to see how other people respond to this.
    -Yes the attributes for both players are different. Kiku has more speed and health than Brobot because of her melee traits. There is no defense attribute. Kiku has: 1250 health points while Bro has: 1000. The Big Meanie(big dude) has: 800 and the other two have below 200. Also yeah Kiku is way cooler so play with her always! :3 (I made her sprite sheet, I also made Big Meanie, Enemy Crawler)

    - The learning process was... kinda non-existent. While there was a screen explaining differences between the characters, the game started me up immediately and I was suddenly and harshly dealing with a bunch of enemies crowding me. Having small waves before what is currently the first one to introduce enemy types would be nice. Like, introduce a wave with just one enemy type (green crabs). Then a wave with a second enemy type (octoroks?), which involves a different approach. Then once you assume the player has learned how to deal with each in isolation, you can have a stage with both of them in it. Then, have a wave where people deal with green crabs while introduced to a buff dude, to learn that they're similar enemy types but the buff dude is stronger while moving slower. Thus, the player learns about how to deal with that enemy type, and then you have buff dudes with octoroks. And then all three!
    For players who die and have to start over, it would also be nice for them to feel their increase in skill, as they go back to that first level and are able to quickly end the wave with mastery of skills.
    This would also give time to let the player flesh out their control and abilities with more of a safety net and comfort than suddenly being overwhelmed by enemies and inevitably dying (both first runs with each character I either died or lost huge amounts of health and then got insta killed in wave 2). While it is the case that many people would die and be compelled to try again, there ARE people who would instead just stop playing altogether.
    -I think the main issue for us was time. I had many level designs scenarios, which we could not finish implementing. So we decided to just show everything in two waves, so the professor would get the idea: each waves get harder, these are all the enemy types. I completely agree with your comment. The first wave should only spawn Sleazy (green), second blue and green, third maybe one heavy unit. We also thought about adding environmental traps such as electrified walls and lasers. With a better structured level design I think it could be challenging without being completely overwhelming. The spawning function is along the lines of: if (#ofenemies < wavecount * 6), if(#ofenemies < wavecount *3) and so on for each enemy type (green the most, big dude the least).

    - There wasn't a pause function <_<;
    or was there? I tried pressing multiple keys and nothing happened, but maybe I just missed it?
    - No pausing for the elite! sorry about that.

    - Let's talk about the character select UI. What it has going for it is that it clearly introduces both characters and explains how they are different.
    My issue with these is that the descriptions and structure involve a lot of reading. OK, relatively not that much, but still, they're blocky paragraphs and means that instead of just being able to jump into the game I have to read.
    And then, based on reading about things I can't possibly know much about (assuming I have never played before or don't know what this game is), I have to make a choice, a choice I am not informed enough to make. Inevitably means I pick a character for shallow reasons ("I guess I'll go with Samus instead of Portal robot"), and then don't know how much of what I'm doing pertains to the character until the point I die and go try the other character. Assuming I do instead of just quitting the game.
    That second one is hard to deal with in a small-scope game, but that first issue can be dealt with with more basic UI.
    For example, things like mario sports games have where they have the character, and then a word and a color naming their gameplay style. Robot could be things like range, or tactical, whereas the bounty hunter is more speed and close-combat. You could still do this with flavor text too, like "KIKU - 'time to get up-close and personal'; "124253 - 'you'll explode before you reach me'", instead of a long paragraph with story-telling about a story no one is going to be interested in (it's an action game) with some of these key words thrown in.
    (Btw, the robot needs a simpler name >_>;)
    - Those are great suggestions, the paragraphs were literally copied from the game design document jajaja. Would your suggestion also be for the abilities?

    - Other UI consideration... I like that the weapons are in the bottom of the screen in a game where enemies approach mainly from the top. Clean, ensures the UI isn't obstructing anything, good stuff. Ways to go further: color coding weapons so their borders let me know what to expect before using them.
    Like, say I didn't read the lines about the weapons... but, I see that this purple circle is yellow, and when I press it it's an AoE attack... now I know if I pick the other character that a yellow border (around the bomb spread for example) is going to be an AoE attack, and will only be compelled to use that when enemies are surrounding me without having to botch it, learn from that, and then wait (and die) while waiting for the re-charge.
    On this, a side note is that the mine power-up feels like the most crucial for the robot, but also the most unintuitive. When I read that you would dash and then drop a mine before doing so, I kept pressing the keys to dash to the right and nothing was happening later on (since Kiku's dash works with keys.) As I learned it worked with clicking, I would still often make the mistake to click in the direction I wanted to dash to, but instead I would drop a bomb in that direction and dash straight into the enemies, dying (it was hilarious btw.) I DO notice that there are little indicators when you activate a power about where it goes and how it would function, but the mine overall still feels unintuitive and it gets confusing going from one character's dash ability to the other's. The indicators are also hard to read when the enemies are all crowding you like you have the last must-have toy in black friday.
    -JAJAJA Black friday toys. I guess making the indicators a different color would help. Dashing forward for Brobots skill works too. I think the decision was that usually as a ranged unit, you are shooting while moving away, so you are aiming towards the enemy moving in the opposite direction, and then you activate it to move even further back. With that said: I find that one of the difficulties we did not manage to surpass were the controls. For example, playing with a keyboard and mouse is a lot easier than with the gamepad, and it is mainly due to our game having influences from MOBA games. That's why some abilities trigger automatically, like AoE and shields, Kiku's abilities except the hook are also automatically cast. The dash works with the moving buttons. I think when I get back to working on the game, the control map is something I will revise, especially for gamepad.

    I think that's all that comes to mind for now design-wise. OH, the music. Who did the music? I kept the character select screen on while writing that last part and the song in there is such an earworm. Pretty good stuff. Feels distinct and fits the game properly, and hasn't gotten grating. I dig it.
    - You should go and get the game: VVVVVV (I have been telling everyone to get it), the song is called: Predestined Fate, I would recommend jumping on youtube and listening to the entire soundtrack. It is le amazing.

    Hope all that helps! I realize of course it's a first effort and given that there's a lot in here that show work and dedication and great design choices. Playing just a little bit reveals the presence of possible advance strategies using weapons and skills and environments, and even good possibilities of co-op from asymmetricality, and it's fun in that the challenge is clear and the rules and ironed out and fair. Lots of good stuff in there, and with more polish it can definitely evolve into more.
    - IT HELPED TONS! One of my teammembers wanted to thank you for taking the time to reviewing the game! We had so much planned at first (the game was supposed to be a dungeon crawler at first!), we also wanted a level system for the abilities jajaja. I think with a bit more of work, the game can turn out to be quite fun as you said once level design and the bugs are fixed!



    This is a reminder too I need to begin investing in development tools and get working on stuff for myself. Been busy with design docs and studying, but I want to get my hands dirty already.
    - I understand that feeling too, although my perspective does not compare to yours seeing your experience in the industry. I am scared and nervous but I would be happy to work with anyone on small projects. I have RPG Maker, and well now I have some Unity knowledge as well. Thanks again, I really appreciate your comments!
    Last edited by K. Kira XXIII; December 14th, 2016 at 03:26 PM.
    Hidden:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamiel View Post
    Try out my first game! All feedback is welcome, enjoy and thanks. Heroine: Kiku
    Hidden:

  16. #36

    Default Re: Explaining how games work?

    Sorry for the double post, but there is a humble bundle going on for making your own game books. You get them all for 15$.
    Hidden:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamiel View Post
    Try out my first game! All feedback is welcome, enjoy and thanks. Heroine: Kiku
    Hidden:

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