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  1. #21
    The Ugly never die loneassassin's Avatar
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    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    As a history buff as well for anyone following major points of history I cannot stress the greatness of the podcast Dan Carlin's Hardcore History. Just listening to the massive amounts of info he gathers to put into multi-part episodes ranging from 3-5 hours tell the history of empires such as the Western Roman Empire, the Mongols ( which is tremendous especially with how close they were from almost conquering the entire known world) as well as How World War I happened it's a must. Plus he has singular episodes focusing on events such as the rise of false prophets coming from the Reformation and others.

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  2. #22
    UNTITLED xan's Avatar
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    Problem with my country's history is its too damn vast and written in so many languages that a single point of reference to understand it is pretty difficult :(

    Apart from that, currently purchased the first edition of the 3 book series about Genghis Khan written by Conn Iggulden. If anybody is interested in knowing about Genghis Khan or about the Mongols, this would be a great set of books to check out. I am preparing myself to read through this series first to then move onto Timur's history. I also like reading about one of Genghis Khan's generals, Subutai, who has had close to 0 defeats in his entire military career where he conquered hell lotta nations

    A "what if" scenario in Mongol history would be the possibility of Subutai attacking Europe successfully if Ogedai hadn't died
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  3. #23

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    So, anyone here thinks that the moon landing was fake?

  4. #24

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    I only wish I knew more history, as I do find all to be extremely fascinating. Unfortunately, stuff before 1700 or so is not my strong suit. : /

    Regardless, at least I can count on AP to teach me some stuff.

  5. #25

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    I like art history, it's really cool like little photographs into the past. Like one of my personal faves was this sketch of Marie Antoinette on the way to her execution by Jacques Louise David



    His personal life was fascinating too lol.


    I also like this drawing by Onfim of him and his father in what's considered to be the world's oldest children's drawing


    It just really fascinating, like to -me- as a viewer, this child's life is perceived in its entirety in a fraction of a second. Like he has already lived his whole life and even his kids and grand kids and anybody that probably knew he even existed at all have already died a long time ago, but here are these drawings that are not only really universally human but are also a fragment of a person's life that prove he existed at all. It's the same with stuff like the Pompeii graffiti. It's just really really great <3

    Can't say anything involving the strictly political side of history particularly interests me tho.

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  6. #26
    Paradoxically Positive minus.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MetaMario View Post
    I only wish I knew more history, as I do find all to be extremely fascinating. Unfortunately, stuff before 1700 or so is not my strong suit. : /
    Yeah same here and even then I have this weird problem that everything lacks connection in my head.
    I think it has to do with how school taught stuff in neat little chunks, that were thematically completely isolated from each other. Sometimes even taught in different school years.
    For example it once felt kinda weird to me that the American and the French revolution happened so imminent to each other. Especially the French revolution was taught to me completely out of context to anything. The first time I felt I didn't have shit under control from a timeline point of view was when I heard that Beethoven wanted to name his 3rd Symphony after Napoleon and even give it to him personally, but then got angry when he declared himself emperor and scratched Napoleon's name from the cover like an angry child (you can even see that hilarious paper displayed in a museum). Or that Marx wrote a letter to Abraham Lincoln. In my mind they lived roughly at the same time but everyone is supposed to do their own thing in their own little sphere. Seperately. Like people saying Mammoths were still around when the Egyptian pyramids were built? This like a silly mash up movie. It's only in modern history that I have a big chunk (but definitely not all) of the players on my radar simultanously. Still, East Asia before the 20th century is just a massive embarrassingly blank spot in my mind, accept for some obscure little anecdotes here and there.



    Quote Originally Posted by taboo View Post

    I also like this drawing by Onfim of him and his father in what's considered to be the world's oldest children's drawing
    http://www.goldschp.net/SIG/onfim/onfim9.jpg

    It just really fascinating, like to -me- as a viewer, this child's life is perceived in its entirety in a fraction of a second. Like he has already lived his whole life and even his kids and grand kids and anybody that probably knew he even existed at all have already died a long time ago, but here are these drawings that are not only really universally human but are also a fragment of a person's life that prove he existed at all. It's the same with stuff like the Pompeii graffiti. It's just really really great <3
    Dear god that's adorable but also kinda poignant as hell. It's little stuff like that make history turn alive for me.
    Last edited by minus.; July 27th, 2015 at 07:42 AM.
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  7. #27
    King of Little Sisters ~ Chrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by minus. View Post
    Yeah same here and even then I have this weird problem that everything lacks connection in my head.
    I think it has to do with how school taught stuff in neat little chunks, that were thematically completely isolated from each other. Sometimes even taught in different school years.
    For example it once felt kinda weird to me that the American and the French revolution happened so imminent to each other. Especially the French revolution was taught to me completely out of context to anything. The first time I felt I didn't have shit under control from a timeline point of view was when I heard that Beethoven wanted to name his 3rd Symphony after Napoleon and even give it to him personally, but then got angry when he declared himself emperor and scratched Napoleon's name from the cover like an angry child (you can even see that hilarious paper displayed in a museum). Or that Marx wrote a letter to Abraham Lincoln. In my mind they lived roughly at the same time but everyone is supposed to do their own thing in their own little sphere. Seperately. Like people saying Mammoths were still around when the Egyptian pyramids were built? This like a silly mash up movie. It's only in modern history that I have a big chunk (but definitely not all) of the players on my radar simultanously. Still, East Asia before the 20th century is just a massive embarrassingly blank spot in my mind, accept for some obscure little anecdotes here and there.




    Dear god that's adorable but also kinda poignant as hell. It's little stuff like that make history turn alive for me.
    Well, that certainly is a common problem with how History is usually taught, I think. Although it's hard to think of a new method that connects all the dots. But it is certainly possible. It's also one of the reasons I find "Byzantium" fascinating. What would you think of me if I told you about the Roman Emperor who ruled Greece and Anatolia from Istanbul in the year 1000, sitting on a throne with golden mechanical roaring lions and whose personal elite army was composed of vikings? Isn't it the most epic picture ever?

    On the American and French revolutions, it's weird you think of them as such separate events. The best thing about them is how they influenced each other and marked this big turning point that basically gives us modern history itself!

    By the way, thanks for contributing to this thread, everyone!

  8. #28
    UNTITLED xan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pachylad View Post
    - This very forum (well if the fucking Arab Spring isn't going to be part of the future history textbooks of tomorrow then I don't know what will be)
    Wow just checked this one out now. Wish I had joined a year earlier.

    No big deal coz we will have somethings to talk about soon. Something nasty is brewing in my part of the globe. If shit goes down in a few years, you heard it here first folks...
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  9. #29

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    When I was in college, I had one of the best classes I had in my life, the history about writing and the need to protect information. Starting with the stone age, going to the phoenicians, passing by the spoken information, later we learned about Gutenberg and finally the today´s books and E-books. This class gave me a better understanding of things nowadays, as in, why we write or have the need to save information.

    Also, I had a class about the history of the libraries, (I recommend reading or watching "The Name of the Rose").


    My favorite history books ? Mostly about the history behind flags (the meaning of the symbols and colors of each one) and a book about the etymology of the names of the countries.


    One thing I always found curious is that, depending on the country (or even the state or different social class) , historical figures have a different aspect of good or evil.


    Going by my country, we have Getúlio Vargas, Duque de Caxias and Collor.


    Going by international, Genghis Khan and Che Guevara.
    Last edited by C_uggs; July 27th, 2015 at 08:59 AM.
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  10. #30
    Crazy Woodwind Lady Envy's Avatar
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    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    History is my favorite non-Arts subject - I have thoroughly enjoyed each and every history class I have taken. Although my greatest point of interest in terms of regions and time periods would be European history (all periods) and ancient history. I enjoy pretty much any aspect of these histories, but I'd say that the aspects that I enjoy learning about the most and in general are the cultural aspects. From there the greatest interest to me is music history and even more specifically the history of instruments, and especially my favorites - brass and woodwind instruments.

    To put it simply, I love history. But I'm not necessarily a history buff... In fact, my current range of best specific knowledge probably goes to the last thing I mentioned. But that's because it's been a consistent thing I've looked into over the years, from personal interest (reading books) to writing research papers, and the like. Sadly, I haven't taken as much of the other histories as I would have liked. But the last class I took - Medieval England a couple of years back - really caught my interest. I feel like when I go back to school I most certainly will go into something History.


  11. #31
    Paradoxically Positive minus.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chrior View Post
    Well, that certainly is a common problem with how History is usually taught, I think. Although it's hard to think of a new method that connects all the dots. But it is certainly possible. It's also one of the reasons I find "Byzantium" fascinating. What would you think of me if I told you about the Roman Emperor who ruled Greece and Anatolia from Istanbul in the year 1000, sitting on a throne with golden mechanical roaring lions and whose personal elite army was composed of vikings? Isn't it the most epic picture ever?

    On the American and French revolutions, it's weird you think of them as such separate events. The best thing about them is how they influenced each other and marked this big turning point that basically gives us modern history itself!

    By the way, thanks for contributing to this thread, everyone!
    I can barely buy the mechanical lion part, but there are also VIKINGS involved???
    I gotta google this right now, can't even come up with a context of how they could have met hahaha
    Thanks for this cool info!

    And yeah, my teacher literally connected the two topics with the line "The French government also didn't have money because of America". That was it. I was 13 or something. I connected the dots when I learned about U.S. American history and France's role in it a couple of years later (but in not too much detail, we focused more on Britain being a meanie)
    Things I think are cool!



  12. #32

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by minus. View Post
    I can barely buy the mechanical lion part, but there are also VIKINGS involved???
    I gotta google this right now, can't even come up with a context of how they could have met hahaha
    Thanks for this cool info!
    Vikings sailed all around the world trading, settling and/or plundering.

    And the rulers of Constantinople found foreign mercenaries more reliable/trustworthy than local recruits.

    Heck i'm fairly certain that they've found some old timey viking graffiti scribbled in a church or mosque in Istanbul.

  13. #33

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by xan View Post
    Problem with my country's history is its too damn vast and written in so many languages that a single point of reference to understand it is pretty difficult :(
    Absolutely goddamn true.
    South Asian history is the titan I've never quite managed to wrestle with successfully.
    So many shifting empires and dynasties coexisting while waxing and waning over a large area with very little if any continuity between them in terms of representing something thematically palatable.

    --- Update From New Post Merge ---

    Quote Originally Posted by KageKageKing View Post
    So, anyone here thinks that the moon landing was fake?
    lol no are you kidding?
    Even a super skeptic should note that the deafening defeated silence of the Soviet Union after the landing is all the proof you need that it actually happened.
    Maybe you should make a separate thread for junk pop culture history and post about conspiracy theories and ANCIENT ALIENS in there.

    --- Update From New Post Merge ---

    Quote Originally Posted by minus. View Post
    Still, East Asia before the 20th century is just a massive embarrassingly blank spot in my mind, accept for some obscure little anecdotes here and there.
    It's surprisingly simple for China.

    Dynasty rises, dynasty does well, things start sucking for various reasons (natural disasters, famine, war, corruption, all of the above), dynasty gets overthrown, new dynasty rises. Repeat until Europe shows up in the 1800's to kick ass and sell opium.

  14. #34
    From Elvis in Memphis Cyan D. Funk's Avatar
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    It's soul-crushing when a professor/historian sources an interesting-sounding book and then mention that the book can only be read in it's native language.

    Seriously I've seen some cool studies cited by Chinese historians...that are only available in Chinese.

  15. #35

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    Like most people i got started with my own national history. Mostly about kings, and wars and intrigue at first.

    Which kinda segued into reading about all the nations Sweden were at war with, or married into, or conspiring with. Got pretty heavily into Russian history, read way more about Peter the great than anyone really should, then it just kinda expanded from there, jumping from places and eras with no real thought, a bit of Rome there, a couple of books on the shaping of Africa, China, Japan, Brazil and just South America in general.

    Still haven't read that much about US history though. But that's mostly cause i haven't really stumbled over any interesting books yet.

  16. #36
    From Elvis in Memphis Cyan D. Funk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfwood View Post
    Still haven't read that much about US history though. But that's mostly cause i haven't really stumbled over any interesting books yet.
    This series is a great start - still ongoing but it's already got the major bits like the Revolution and the Civil War (McPherson is my spirit animal.) All well-regarded, though I've heard that The Glorious Cause has problems holding up with 2015 scholarship on the Revolution.

  17. #37

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    I love history, but I'm kind of a casual. As in, I don't care for history that roughly predates the 17th century.

  18. #38

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    Quote Originally Posted by Cyan D. Funk View Post
    This series is a great start - still ongoing but it's already got the major bits like the Revolution and the Civil War (McPherson is my spirit animal.) All well-regarded, though I've heard that The Glorious Cause has problems holding up with 2015 scholarship on the Revolution.
    Oh i like those kind of overview books. It's always good to have a blue print of what happend.

    But yeah i really need to read some of those, cause when you guys are talking about y'know the trail of tears, or Jackson, i sorta know what you are talking about in that i know what took place. Like the gist of it all, but i have no idea about why it happend, what it was in reaction to, who were associated with it or their reasoning behind it all. None of the meat and bones

  19. #39

    Default Re: History enthusiasts

    It's a college textbook, but Give Me Liberty: An American History by Eric Foner reads incredibly well.

  20. #40
    King of Little Sisters ~ Chrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey King View Post
    It's surprisingly simple for China.

    Dynasty rises, dynasty does well, things start sucking for various reasons (natural disasters, famine, war, corruption, all of the above), dynasty gets overthrown, new dynasty rises. Repeat until Europe shows up in the 1800's to kick ass and sell opium.
    Don't forget the Mongol conquest. That was sort of a new thing among all the monotony of rise and fall of dynasties that was so in line with traditional chinese philosophy. Damn, the Mongols broke basically everything, didn't they?

    --- Update From New Post Merge ---

    Quote Originally Posted by xan View Post
    Problem with my country's history is its too damn vast and written in so many languages that a single point of reference to understand it is pretty difficult :(
    Where the hell are you from?

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